Sebastian Modrow

Assistant Professor
225 Hinds Hall
315.443.4681
smodrow@syr.edu
Overview

Dr. Sebastian Modrow is an Assistant Professor at Syracuse University’s School of Information Studies. He received a doctorate in Ancient History from the University of Rostock, Germany, an Exam of the State degree (Masters equivalent) in History and Latin from the University of Greifswald, Germany, and a MLIS and a CAS in Cultural Heritage Preservation from Syracuse University.

Previous work experiences include Lecturer for Latin at the University of Greifswald, Oldfather Research Fellow at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Teacher for Latin and history, Coordinator of Syracuse University Libraries’ Marcel Breuer Digital Archives project, Assistant Archivist as well Curator of Rare Books and Manuscripts at Syracuse University Libraries’ Special Collections Research Center.

Research

Sebastian’s scholarship explores the intersection of history, heritage, and memory studies within the realms of libraries and archives. Engaging with topics such as literacy, information access, and power in pre-modern societies, as well as identity narratives and the othering of whole populations during acts of colonization (ancient and modern), his research examines questions that include: How do shifts in the political system manifest themselves in the information landscape of pre-modern societies? What was recorded and archived? Who had access to what kind of information and who was barred? How do the collective memories of various social groups interact in ancient and modern contexts, what is the impact on identity narratives and what is the role of ‘the archive’?

Most Recent Publication:

Modrow, Sebastian. “Classical Antiquity.” In Libraries, Archives, Museums: An Introduction to Cultural Heritage Institutions Through the Ages, edited by Suzanne M. Stauffer, 17-40. Lanham-London: Rowman & Littlefield, 2021.

Teaching

Sebastian’s teaching is focused on cultural heritage preservation, special collections and archives, the history of the book as well as the history of libraries and archives.