DoodleBook

DoodleBook: A New Tool for Digital Learning

  Over the past year, Dr. Jun Wang, research assistant professor at the School of Information Studies at Syracuse University; his research partner, Felice Frankel, a research scientist at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT); a team of students from across Syracuse University; and me, serving as a project research assistant, worked to create a new … Continued


M.I.N.D. lab

Sarah Bratt G’14: Brain Data, Summer Research, and Internships

(Editor’s Note: This post was written by Sarah Bratt, a recent graduate of the master’s degree program in Library and Information Science at the School of Information Studies at Syracuse University. She’s now working at the SU M.I.N.D. lab.)  P.S. – If you’re interested in the lab, there’s an open event on Thursday, July 9 from 9 … Continued


A Nexus of Student Research – and One NEXIS Lab Student’s Path

The NEXIS student research lab occupies a place of pride at the iSchool, enabling students to pursue special projects in an unconventional setting. Many students are quick to associate this facility with the emerging technology that it houses and the educational seminars that NEXIS members frequently host. Yet sometimes, people have trouble in comprehending the … Continued


3 Reasons for Undergrads to do Research

A research university does not always have to house 20,000+ students, faculty, and staff. Today, all an institution needs to do research is a single person, an interest, some resources, and a local coffee shop to work in. Over the years, research has gotten a bad reputation because of the countless term papers college classes … Continued


Facebook Users or Lab Rats: Ethical Research in the Age of Big Data

Editor’s Note: This post is written by Jenny Stromer-Galley, Associate Professor here at the iSchool and Vice President of the Association of Internet Researchers; it originally appeared on her blog on July 1, 2014. A firestorm, in the academic world anyway, erupted this week when the AV Club posted a short review and commentary of … Continued


Natural Gas Production and Consumption visualization

Drawing with Data: Top 5 Student Data Visualizations

Earlier this month, students in Jaime Snyder’s Information Visualization class displayed their semester-culminating work with a poster session.  Topics of the posts ranged from social network users to natural gas production to resources allocated to Syrian Refugees. Here are some highlights of the student’s work, along with a bit of background on each: 1.  Resources … Continued


Photo via smithsonianmag.com

Games As Educational Tools: Teaching Skills, Transforming Thoughts

Games, and the entertainment value of play, have the ability to teach and transform. We don’t think about that as children playing hide-and-seek in the neighborhood. We don’t acknowledge it during turns at charades or throughout the rounds of a board game. That’s because games are engaging and entertaining. And precisely because they are, research shows, … Continued


dna

Digital Data Finds an Ancient Abode in DNA

In 2012, scientists achieved an engineering feat which combined billions of years of development by nature and the next generation of bio-engineering, opening the gate to a new frontier of bleeding edge data storage technology. This new data storage solution is encoding DNA to store digital data that can hold millions of gigabytes of data … Continued


research_word_in_dictionary_magnified_sepia

A Brief Introduction to The Research Life

Editors’s Note:  The following is a post from Professor Steve Sawyer, the Associate Dean for Research and Doctoral Programs here at the iSchool.  This post is the first in a series focused on research.   One distinguishing character of great universities like Syracuse is the attention paid to research.  Since most of us last thought … Continued


words

The Importance of Academic Libraries

On a philosophical note, finding articles and searching for information is one part of learning about the world of learning, and part of the experience of coming to a college or university. We learn from and with others during our four (or more years) of connectedness with an institution. We learn about the research process from instructors, peers, and the recorded and preserved work of others, much of which is available in libraries. We are all part of a larger environment that promotes learning, now and in the future – and we work together on this.