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7 Questions with an LIS Professor: Barbara Stripling

(Editor’s Note: This is the sixth in a series of posts profiling the iSchool’s Library and Information Science faculty. Check out previous 7 Question posts with R. David Lankes, Renee F. Hill, Jill Hurst-Wahl, Jian Qin, and Marilyn Arnone) Barbara Stripling, or Barb, emanates both kindness and innate leadership. Her care for each student is reflected in her… Read the full article…


High-Speed Internet Access in Syracuse: Dr. Garcia-Murillo’s Public Service Commission Testimony

(Editor’s Note: School of Information Studies Professor Martha Garcia-Murillo, an expert in global telecommunications access policy and regulations, provided testimony to the New York State Public Service Commission’s hearing in Syracuse last week regarding the region’s access to high-quality, high-speed Internet access. Dr. Garcia-Murillo specializes in regulation of information and communication related industries. A capsule look… Read the full article…


The End of Libraries? Not so Fast, MG Siegler

The foundation of libraries and librarianship has shifted dramatically over the last decade or so.  Digital resources provide access to seemingly boundless quantities of information, virtually untethered to physical repositories.  The internet has seemingly built a library in every modem and made every user a librarian.  While this prompts some observers to cast the future… Read the full article…


Gaming and Play in the Library: A Brief History

The international academic journal Library Quarterly recently published my article tracing the history of gaming in libraries back to the 1850s. You can see the entire article in the publications area of my game lab, Because Play Matters. I wanted to offer a few highlights here about how public libraries have used games over the years…. Read the full article…


8 Reasons Information Professionals Should Care About Accessibility

Jay Yarrow’s 12 Most Annoying Things That Tech Companies Need To Fix Right Now gets a lot right, but misses what I consider to be a significant technology problem: lack of accessibility and poor usability for people with disabilities.

Designing for accessibility is making products and services so that people with disabilities can use them. One could easily assemble a long list of technology accessibility failures. As a budding librarian, I am dismayed by the accessibility problems of library services. Kelly Ford has written about accessibility issues with ebook services and ebook readers (e.g. Kindle). As a music lover, I am disappointed by accessibility problems in online music services like Spotify, Pandora, and iTunes for people with visual impairments who use screen readers like JAWS or Apple VoiceOver to read digital text.